Research Database

The only comprehensive database for clinical and medical research papers on the healthy benefits of matcha/green tea.

Search research compiled by Breakaway Matcha

The only comprehensive database for clinical and medical research papers on the healthy benefits of matcha/green tea.

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Cognitive Function

Cognitive Function

Matcha consumption leads to much higher intake of green tea phytochemicals compared to regular green tea. Previous research on caffeine, L-theanine, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) repeatedly demonstrated benefits on cognitive performance.

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Heart Health

Heart Health

According to Harvard Medical School, “lowering your risk of cardiovascular disease may be as easy as drinking green tea. Studies suggest this light, aromatic tea may lower LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, which may be responsible for the tea's association with reduced risk of death from heart disease and stroke.”

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Mental Health

Mental Health

Matcha contains an amino acid called L-theanine, which has been shown to reduce physiological and psychological stresses. L-theanine also improves cognition and mood in a synergistic manner with caffeine, and promotes alpha wave production in the brain

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Cancer Prevention

Cancer Prevention

Matcha/green tea has for many centuries been regarded as an essential part of good health in Japan and China. Many believe it can help reduce the risk of cancer, and a growing body of evidence backs this up.

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Immunity

Immunity

A recent study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that drinking matcha daily greatly enhanced the overall response of the immune system. The exceedingly high levels of antioxidants in matcha mainly take the form of polyphenols, catechins, and flavonoids, each of which aids the body’s defense in its daily struggles against free radicals that come from the pollution in your air, water and foods.

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Most Recent Research Articles

Identification of green tea grade using different feature of response signal from E-nose sensors

Author: Huichun Yu and Jun Wang and Hongmei Zhang and Yong Yu and Cong Yao

Detection of tea grade by a human taste panel is affected by external factors and usually inaccurate, but it might be promising to use an electronic nose (E-nose). In this paper an investigation has been made to determine the grade of different tea samples using an E-nose. Feature vectors of the teas with different quality grade (Labeled: T120, T600, T800, T1200 and T1800) were extracted from the E-nose response signals, and the data were processed by using the principle components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Using the average and integrated value of feature vectors, 100% correct classification by LDA was achieved for five different tea samples with different qualities. The results indicated that the E-nose was capable of discriminating different grades of green teas.

 

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Drying of aqueous green tea extracts using a supercritical fluid spray process

Author: D. Meterc and M. Petermann and E. Weidner

Natural extracts are widely used in groceries, in pharmaceutics and nutraceuticals. For foods these extracts are mainly used for flavoring or coloring the products. For pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals active ingredients like antioxidants are of special interest. Traditionally these extracts are obtained by water or organic solvent extraction. Afterwards the liquid extracts are dried with classical spray drying techniques or freeze drying. In this work a new process for the gentle drying of natural extracts is presented. The process is based on a high-pressure spray technique called particles from gas saturated solutions (PGSS). The solution to be dried is dosed with a high-pressure pump to a static mixer, where compressed and preheated carbon dioxide is added. Afterwards this mixture is rapidly depressurized from high pressure via a nozzle into a spray tower, operated at ambient pressure—fine droplets are formed. By adjusting the pre-expansion conditions it is possible to evaporate the solvent in spray tower. The solvent can be withdrawn with the expanded carbon dioxide and finally a dry powder of the extract is obtained. Like the most supercritical fluid processes the drying is carried out at low temperature (30–60 °C) and in an inert, oxygen-free atmosphere. This makes the process very promising for sensitive substances. First investigations with this technique were made with green tea extracts, which contain antioxidants polyphenols. Dry and free flowing powders were obtained by the spray process without degradation of the active ingredients.

 

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Mineral content of some herbs and herbal teas by infusion and decoction

Author: Mehmet Musa Özcan and Ahmet Ünver and Tolga Uçar and Derya Arslan

Sage (Salvia fruticosa L.), anise (Pimpinella anisum L.), Hawthorn (Crataegus orientalis), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), mountain tea (Sideritis spp), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), lime flower (Tilia cordata), nettle (Urtica dioica L.), thyme (Thymbra spicata), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosehip (Rosa canina L.), mentha (Mentha piperita L.), balm (Melissa officinalis L.), tea (Camelia sinensis L.) (Black and green), sena leaf (Casia angustifolia), camomile (Matricaria chamomilla), tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus L.), cinnamon (Cinnamomum casia) and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.) were used as plant material in this study. Decoction was applied to R. caninaA. dracunculus and C. casia, and infusion was applied to other plant materials. Ten, 15 and 20 min were used as a time parameter for both infusion and decection. Inductive coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AEs) has been used for the determination of the elements in all infusions, decoctions and plant material. The Fe (1295.65 ppm) and Mg (3178.74 ppm) of M. officinalis, P (12698.05 ppm) and Pb (3.85 ppm) of green tea, Ca (19685.70 ppm) of C. orientalis, K (29167.53 ppm), Cu (12.18 ppm) and Na (2563.86 ppm) of C. casia, Zn (26.00 ppm) of M. chamomille and Se (23.53 ppm) contents of C. sativum were higher than the other plant materials. Ca (28.621 mg/100 ml) was the highest in concentration in the infusion of C. angustifolia for 10, 15 and 20 min. Ca could not be found in black and green teas. K (231.390 mg/100 ml) and P (24.857 mg/100 ml) contents were the highest in A. dracunculus tea. Mg (16.230 mg/100 ml) content of O. basilicumwas determined as the highest. In general, the minerals that difuse to the tea at higher concentrations at the 10th minute were Ag, B, Cu, Co, Fe, ln and Zn, at the 15th minute were Ag, B, Cu, Co, K, ln and Zn and at the 20th minute were Ag, B, Cu, Co, ln, Fe and K. As a result, 10 min was the optimum time for getting the minerals into the tea, and it is apparent that plants and teas are good sources of the minerals.

 

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Green tea extract as a natural antioxidant to extend the shelf-life of fresh-cut lettuce

Author: Ana B. Martín-Diana and Daniel Rico and Catherine Barry-Ryan

Green tea extract (GT) was evaluated as a preservative treatment for fresh-cut lettuce. Different quality markers, e.g. respiration, browning, ascorbic acid and carotenoid content were evaluated. GT concentration (0.25, 0.5 and 1 g 100 mL− 1) and temperature (20 °C and 50 °C) were tested. Optimal GT treatment (0.25 g 100 mL− 1 at 20 °C) was compared with chlorine (120 ppm at 20 °C). High GT concentrations (0.5 g 100 mL− 1 and 1.0 g 100 mL− 1) maintained better prevent ascorbic acid and carotenoid loss than 0.25 g 100 mL− 1 GT and chlorine. GT increased browning of samples, probably due to the content of polyphenols of the treatment; the use of heat-shock reduced this negative effect. GT and heat-shock combined also showed negative effects, reducing the antioxidant content (ascorbic acid and carotenoids). No significant differences were observed between chlorine and optimal GT (0.25 g 100 mL− 1 at 20 °C) in browning appearance and sensory properties. GT better kept the antioxidant activity of the samples than chlorine. Industrial relevance An alternative treatment for minimally processed Iceberg lettuce is tested, based on its antioxidant capacity. Minimally processed industry is constantly looking for new treatments to avoid the use of chlorine which is a standard at the moment.

 

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Phenolic content and antioxidative capacity of green and white tea extracts depending on extraction conditions and the solvent used

Author: Gordana Rusak and Draženka Komes and Saša Likić and Dunja Horžić and Maja Kovač

The efficiencies of different solvents in the extraction of phenolics from bagged and loose leaves of white and green tea, after different extraction times, as well as the antioxidative capacity of the obtained extracts, were investigated. The developed HPLC method has the potential to separate and determinate 17 phenolics widely distributed in plants, but in investigated tea extracts only four catechins and traces of three flavonols and one flavone were separated and detected based on comparison with authentic standards. The extraction efficiency of phenolics depended strongly on the time of extraction and the solvents used. The extraction of catechins from green tea was significantly affected by the form (bagged or loose) of the tea, whereas this effect was shown not to be statistically significant for white tea. Green tea was a richer source of phenolics than was white tea. The extraction of phenolics from white tea by water could be accelerated by the addition of lemon juice. Aqueous ethanol (40%) was most effective in the prolonged extraction of catechins. The antioxidative capacity of the investigated tea extracts correlated with their phenolic content.

 

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The antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging potential of two different solvent extracts of Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntz, Ficus bengalensis L. and Ficus racemosa L.

Author: Rajesh Manian and Nagarajan Anusuya and Perumal Siddhuraju and Sellamuthu Manian

The stem bark and fruits of Ficus bengalensis L. and Ficus racemosa L. are used in India for the treatment of diabetes and a number of other diseases. Since these effects may be correlated with the presence of antioxidant compounds, methanol and 70% acetone (acetone:water, 70:30) extracts of F. bengalensis(aerial root) and F. racemosa (stem bark) were evaluated for their antioxidant activity and radical scavenging capacity in comparison with Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntz (green tea). Methanol extracts of green tea and F. bengalensis and 70% acetone extract of F. racemosa contained relatively higher levels of total phenolics than the other extracts. The antioxidant potential of the extracts were assessed by employing different in vitro assays such as reducing power assay, DPPH, ABTS+ and OH radical scavenging capacities, peroxidation inhibiting activity through linoleic acid emulsion system, antihemolytic assay by hydrogen peroxide induced method and metal ion chelating ability. Though all the extracts exhibited dose dependent reducing power activity, methanol extracts of all the samples were found to have more hydrogen donating ability. Similar line of dose dependent activity has been maintained in all the samples in DPPH and OH scavenging systems. All the extracts exhibited antioxidant activity against the linoleic acid emulsion system (34–38%). The potential of multiple antioxidant activity was evident as it possessed antihemolytic activity and metal ion chelating potency.

 

 

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Catechin stability of EGC- and EGCG-enriched tea drinks produced by a two-step extraction procedure

Author: David Labbé and Bernard Têtu and Dominique Trudel and Laurent Bazinet

Catechin content of green tea drinks commercially available is reported to be very low in comparison with tea traditionally prepared, due to catechins conversion to their corresponding epimers during production. The purpose of this present study was to produce catechin-enriched tea drinks according to a two-step brewing procedure and to verify the catechin stability of those enriched drinks during storage. Those results confirmed that it is possible to produce EGC- and EGCG-enriched tea drinks regardless of the green tea used. Good extraction efficiencies were reached for the first and second extraction steps with catechin extraction yields ranging from 63.6% to 84.8%. Furthermore, it appeared that the catechin content in the two enriched tea drinks demonstrated a great stability since no significant degradation occurred within 8 weeks of storage. This simple two-step extraction procedure could be considered as an interesting way to produce enriched green tea drinks with more potent and stable bioactive catechins.

 

 

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Covalent modification of proteins by green tea polyphenol (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate through autoxidation

Author: Takeshi Ishii and Taiki Mori and Tomoko Tanaka and Daisuke Mizuno and Ryoichi Yamaji and Shigenori Kumazawa and Tsutomu Nakayama and Mitsugu Akagawa

Green tea polyphenol (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has various beneficial properties including chemopreventive, anticarcinogenic, and antioxidant actions. The interaction with proteins known as EGCG-binding targets may be related to the anticancer effects. However, the binding mechanisms for this activity remain poorly understood. Using mass spectrometry and chemical detection methods, we found that EGCG forms covalent adducts with cysteinyl thiol residues in proteins through autoxidation. To investigate the functional modulation caused by binding of EGCG, we examined the interaction between EGCG and a thiol enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Concentration-dependent covalent binding of EGCG to GAPDH was found to be coupled to the irreversible inhibition of GAPDH activity. Mutation experiments revealed that EGCG is primarily bound to the cysteinyl thiol group of the active center, indicating that the irreversible inhibition of GAPDH is due to the covalent attachment of EGCG to the active-center cysteine. Moreover, using EGCG-treated cancer cells, we identified GAPDH as a target of EGCG covalent binding through specific interactions between catechols and aminophenyl boronate agarose resin. Based on these findings, we propose that the covalent modification of proteins by EGCG may be a novel pathway related to the biological activity of EGCG.

 

 

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Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tea infusions

Author: M. Pilar Almajano and Rosa Carbó and J. Angel López Jiménez and Michael H. Gordon

Tea polyphenols, especially the catechins, are potent antimicrobial and antioxidant agents, with positive effects on human health. White tea is one of the less studied teas but the flavour is more accepted than that of green tea in Europe. The concentrations of various catechins in 13 different kinds of infusion were determined by capillary electrophoresis. The total polyphenol content (Folin–Ciocalteu method), the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC value determined with the 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation) and the inhibitory effects of infusions on the growth of some microorganisms were determined. Five different infusions (black, white, green and red teas and rooibos infusion) were added to a model food system, comprising a sunflower oil-in-water emulsion containing 0% or 0.2% bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the oxidative stability was studied during storage at 37 °C. Oxidation of the oil was monitored by determination of the peroxide value. The highest radical-scavenging activity observed was for the green and white teas. Emulsions containing these extracts from these teas were much more stable during storage when BSA was present than when it was not present, even though BSA itself did not provide an antioxidant effect (at 0.2% concentration). Rooibos infusion did not show the same synergy with BSA. Green tea and white tea showed similar inhibitions of several microorganisms and the magnitude of this was comparable to that of the commercial infusion 2 (C.I.2), “té de la belleza”. This tea also had an antioxidant activity comparable to green tea.

 

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